Randy May Family in Hillsboro Oregon

August 17, 2012

Exploring Ghost Towns and Mining Camps…

I have never had the chance to do so yet, but I have always wanted to visit Ghost Towns and old mining camps.

This post is started to serve as a platform to connect any and all articles that I write and post concerning exploring and discovering ghost towns and mining camps and maybe a little about learning to pan for gold!

October 5, 2011

Backpacking and Camping the Bayocean Peninsula near Cape Meares Oregon

Just got back from a quick and easy weekend adventure that most any family or group with minimal equipment can enjoy and wanted to share it.

First of all this is a roughly 7 mile total trip and basically completely flat terrain. There is plenty of parking, a hard packed service road on the Tillamook Bay side of the peninsula and a wide sandy beach on the ocean side of it. The peninsula is about a quarter mile wide and has trails that cross back and forth and is open to non-motorized traffic; i.e., foot, bike and equestrian. I am not aware of any fresh water sources on the peninsula that are even fit to filter from much less drink from otherwise. We do take the water we will need for the entire trip. Most of the peninsula is part of a local county park.

Great trip and I will add more info and photos when I can

June 30, 2010

Ramona Falls

Filed under: Backpacking,Camping,Hiking,Scenic Trips — rmay4 @ 8:52 pm
Tags: , , ,

This is one of the most beautiful water falls I have seen in Oregon.  There are larger and higher and more of this or more of that, but in the ability to create unique awe and beauty, Ramona Falls wins.

I did not do the loop trail.  I visited and camped there as part of a trip from Barlow Pass to Paradise and then Timberline Lodge.  That made a nice and easy trip filled with magical camping spots since the next night we camped at Paradise and its name does self describe it.  Especially if you take a hike up the hill to the plateau over-looking Paradise in the evening to watch the sunset.

If you are just out for the day, it is still a recommended spot to see.  I would plan it around sitting to eat or just rest a while at this falls.  It is too beautiful to just pass by and keep going.

See ya on the trail.

http://www.nwhiker.com/MHNFHike18.html

June 18, 2010

Crazy Effective, Cheap, and Green? Baking Soda

There are so many great ideas that we have ruined through technology.  Baking Soda is an example of that.  We have created and mfg hundreds of products to what it is has always done and done well.  Now we have thousands of people marketing and promoting products that are not as good nor as good for us as plain old baking soda.

I found this post on Yahoo and had to pass it on.  This is crazy…

40 fantastic uses for baking soda

By Melissa Breyer Posted Tue Jun 15, 2010 10:01am PDT Related topics: Health, Cleaning, Tips, Hou

Most of us know that baking soda can be used for more than just making homemade cookies and other dough rise. It’s not uncommon to see an open box of this leavening agent deodorizing refrigerators, for example. But did you know that there are at least 40 different ways to use baking soda?

Baking soda makes a perfect stand-in for many personal care, cleaning, and deodorizing products. The list of benefits is long: It is inexpensive, free of toxic chemicals, versatile, and effective.

Wondering how baking soda, aka sodium bicarbonate, works its magic? It helps regulate pH — keeping a substance neither too acidic nor too alkaline. When baking soda comes in contact with either an acidic or an alkaline substance, its natural effect is to neutralize that pH. Beyond that, baking soda has the ability to retard further changes in the pH balance, known as buffering.

This dual capability of neutralizing and buffering allows baking soda to do things such as neutralize acidic odors (like in the refrigerator) as well as maintain neutral pH (like in your laundry water, which helps boost your detergent’s power). It’s a simple reaction, but one that has far-reaching effects for a number of cleaning and deodorizing tasks.

And so without further ado, here are some of the many creative ways you can use baking soda.

Personal Care

1. Make toothpaste
A paste made from baking soda and a 3 percent hydrogen peroxide solution can be used as an alternative to commercial non-fluoride toothpastes. (Or here’s a formula for a minty version.) You can also just dip your toothbrush with toothpaste into baking soda for an extra boost.

2. Freshen your mouth
Put one teaspoon in half a glass of water, swish, spit, and rinse. Odors are neutralized, not just covered up.

3. Soak oral appliance
Soak oral appliances (like retainers, mouthpieces, and dentures) in a solution of 2 teaspoons baking soda dissolved in a glass or small bowl of warm water. The baking soda loosens food particles and neutralizes odors to keep appliances fresh. You can also brush appliances clean using baking soda.

4. Use as a facial scrub and body exfoliant
Give yourself an invigorating facial and body scrub. Make a paste of 3 parts baking soda to 1 part water. Rub in a gentle circular motion to exfoliate the skin. Rinse clean. This is gentle enough for daily use.

5. Skip harsh deodorant
Pat baking soda onto your underarms to neutralize body odor.

6. Use as an antacid
Baking soda is a safe and effective antacid to relieve heartburn, sour stomach, and/or acid indigestion. Refer to baking soda package for instructions.

7. Treat insect bites and itchy skin
For insect bites, make a paste out of baking soda and water, and apply as a salve onto affected skin. To ease the itch, shake some baking soda into your hand and rub it into damp skin after bath or shower.

8. Make a hand cleanser and softener
Skip harsh soaps and gently scrub away ground-in dirt and neutralize odors on hands with a paste of 3 parts baking soda to 1 part water or 3 parts baking soda with gentle liquid hand soap. Then rinse clean.

9. Help your hair
Vinegar is amazing for your hair, but baking soda has its place in the shower too. Sprinkle a small amount of baking soda into your palm along with your favorite shampoo. Shampoo as usual and rinse thoroughly — baking soda helps remove the residue that styling products leave behind so your hair is cleaner and more manageable.

10. Clean brushes and combs
For lustrous hair with more shine, keep brushes and combs clean. Remove natural oil build-up and hair product residue by soaking combs and brushes in a solution of 1 teaspoon of baking soda in a small basin of warm water. Rinse and allow to dry.

11. Make a bath soak
Add 1/2 cup of baking soda to your bath to neutralize acids on the skin and help wash away oil and perspiration. It also makes your skin feel very soft. Or just focus on soothing your feet. Dissolve 3 tablespoons of baking soda in a tub of warm water and soak feet. Gently scrub.

Cleaning

12. Make a surface soft scrub
For safe, effective cleaning of bathroom tubs, tile, and sinks — even fiberglass and glossy tiles — sprinkle baking soda lightly on a clean damp sponge and scrub as usual. Rinse thoroughly and wipe dry. For extra cleaning power, make a paste with baking soda, coarse salt, and liquid dish soap — let it sit then scour off.

13. Hand-wash dishes and pots and pans
Add 2 heaping tablespoons baking soda (along with your regular dish detergent) to the dish water to help cut grease and foods left on dishes, pots, and pans. For cooked-on foods, let them soak in the baking soda and detergent with water first, then use dry baking soda on a clean damp sponge or cloth as a scratch-less scouring powder.

14. Freshen sponges
Soak stale-smelling sponges in a strong baking soda solution to get rid of the mess (4 tablespoons of baking soda dissolved in 1 quart of warm water). For more thorough disinfecting, use the microwave.

15. Clean the microwave
Baking soda on a clean damp sponge cleans gently inside and outside the microwave and never leaves a harsh chemical smell. Rinse well with water.

16. Polish silver flatware
Use a baking soda paste made with 3 parts baking soda to 1 part water. Rub onto the silver with a clean cloth or sponge. Rinse thoroughly and dry for shining sterling and silver-plate serving pieces.

17. Clean coffee and tea pots
Remove coffee and tea stains and eliminate bitter off-tastes by washing mugs and coffee makers in a solution of 1/4 cup baking soda in 1 quart of warm water. For stubborn stains, try soaking overnight in the baking soda solution and detergent or scrubbing with baking soda on a clean damp sponge.

18. Clean the oven
Sprinkle baking soda onto the bottom of the oven. Spray with water to dampen the baking soda. Let sit overnight. In the morning, scrub, scoop the baking soda and grime out with a sponge, or vacuum, and rinse.

19. Clean floors
Remove dirt and grime (without unwanted scratch marks) from no-wax and tile floors using 1/2 cup baking soda in a bucket of warm water — mop and rinse clean for a sparkling floor. For scuff marks, use baking soda on a clean damp sponge, then rinse.

20. Clean furniture
Clean and remove marks (even crayon) from walls and painted furniture by applying baking soda to a damp sponge and rubbing lightly. Wipe off with a clean, dry cloth.

21. Clean shower curtains
Clean and deodorize your vinyl shower curtain by sprinkling baking soda directly on a clean damp sponge or brush. Scrub the shower curtain and rinse clean. Hang it up to dry.

22. Boost your liquid laundry detergent
Give your laundry a boost by adding 1/2 cup of baking soda to your laundry to make liquid detergent work harder. A better balance of pH in the wash gets clothes cleaner, fresher, and brighter. Or you can add 1/2 cup of baking soda to the rinse cycle for fresher sheets and towels or to neutralize gym clothes and odoriferous clothing.

23. Clean and freshen sports gear
Use a baking soda solution (4 tablespoons baking soda in 1 quart warm water) to clean and deodorize smelly sports equipment. Sprinkle baking soda into golf bags and gym bags to deodorize and clean golf irons (without scratching them!) with a baking soda paste (3 parts baking soda to 1 part water) and a brush. Rinse thoroughly.

24. Remove oil and grease stains
Use baking soda to clean up light-duty oil and grease spills on your garage floor or in your driveway. Sprinkle baking soda on the spot and scrub with a wet brush.

25. Clean batteries
Baking soda can be used to neutralize battery acid corrosion on cars, mowers, etc., because its a mild alkali. Be sure to disconnect the battery terminals before cleaning. Make a paste of 3 parts baking soda to 1 part water and apply with a damp cloth to scrub corrosion from the battery terminal. After cleaning and reconnecting the terminals, wipe them with petroleum jelly to prevent future corrosion. Please be careful when working around a battery — they contain a strong acid.

26. Clean cars
Use baking soda to clean your car lights, chrome, windows, tires, vinyl seats, and floor mats without worrying about unwanted scratch marks. Use a baking soda solution of 1/4 cup baking soda in 1 quart of warm water. Apply with a sponge or soft cloth to remove road grime, tree sap, bugs, and tar. For stubborn stains use baking soda sprinkled on a damp sponge or soft brush. Eliminate odors by sprinkling baking soda directly on fabric car seats and carpets. Wait 15 minutes (or longer for strong odors) and vacuum up the baking soda.

Deodorizing

27. Deodorize your refrigerator
Place an open box in the back of the fridge to neutralize odors.

28. Deodorize trashcans and recyclables
Sprinkle baking soda on the bottom of your trashcan to keep stinky trash smells at bay. Clean your recyclables container periodically by sprinkling baking soda on a damp sponge. Wipe clean and rinse. Also, sprinkle baking soda on top as you add recyclables to the bin.

29. Deodorize drains and garbage disposals
To deodorize your sink and tub drains and garbage disposal and keep lingering odors from resurfacing, pour 1/2 cup of baking soda down the drain while running warm tap water — it will neutralize both acid and basic odors for a fresh drain. (This a good way to dispose of baking soda that is being retired from your refrigerator.)

30. Deodorize and clean dishwashers
Use baking soda to deodorize before you run the dishwasher and then as a gentle cleanser in the wash cycle.

31. Deodorize lunch boxes
Between uses, place a spill-proof box of baking soda in everyone’s lunch box to absorb lingering odors.

32. Remove odor from carpets
Liberally sprinkle baking soda on the carpet. Let set overnight or as long as possible (the longer it sets the better it works). Sweep up the larger amounts of baking soda, and vacuum up the rest. (Note that your vacuum cleaner bag will get full and heavy.) An added bonus: You’ll also deodorize your vacuum cleaner.

33. Freshen closets
Place a box on the shelf to keep the closet smelling fresh.

34. Deodorize pet items
Cover the bottom of your cat box with baking soda, then fill as usual with litter. To freshen between changes, sprinkle baking soda on top of the litter after a thorough cleaning. Eliminate odors from your pet’s bedding by sprinkling liberally with baking soda, wait 15 minutes (or longer for stronger odors), then vacuum up.

35. Deodorize sneakers
Keep odors from spreading in smelly sneakers by shaking baking soda into them when not in use. Shake out before wearing.

36. Freshen stuffed animals
Keep favorite cuddly toys fresh with a dry shower of baking soda. Sprinkle baking soda on and let it sit for 15 minutes before brushing off.

Miscellaneous

37. Cure all camping needs
Baking soda is a must-have for your next camping trip. It’s a dish-washer, pot-scrubber, hand-cleanser, deodorant, toothpaste, and fire extinguisher, and has many other uses.

38. Extinguish fires
Baking soda can help in the initial handling of minor grease or electrical kitchen fires, because when baking soda is heated, it gives off carbon dioxide, which helps to smother the flames. For small cooking fires (frying pans, broilers, ovens, grills), turn off the gas or electricity if you can safely do so. Stand back and throw handfuls of baking soda at the base of the flame to help put out the fire — and call the fire department just to be safe.

39. Care for the septic system
Regular use of baking soda in your drains can help keep your septic system flowing freely. One cup of baking soda per week will help maintain a favorable pH in your septic tank.

40. Scrub fruits and vegetables
Baking soda is the food safe way to clean dirt and residue off fresh fruit and vegetables. Just sprinkle a little on a clean damp sponge, scrub and rinse. Here’s another way to clean your vegetables as well.

OK, so there are my 40 suggestions (with a little help from the Arm & Hammond baking soda site, thank you). Do you have any tips or tricks that I missed? Please share in the comments.

Source: http://green.yahoo.com/blog/care2/4/40-fantastic-uses-for-baking-soda.html

You can follow the link and other commentators have added even more ideas and uses to the list.

There are also other articles on the many uses of Vinegar, 14 creative uses for the lemon, and things other than brushing your teeth to do with toothpaste.

Enjoy,
Randy May

June 3, 2010

My Review of Open Country 2 Quart Pot with Lid

Filed under: Backpacking,Camping,Canoeing,Survival — rmay4 @ 5:32 am
Tags: , ,

Originally submitted at REI

This durable, heavy-duty aluminum kettle stands up to the rigors of the backcountry.

I like it

By rmay4 from Hillsboro, OR on 6/2/2010
4out of 5

Gift: No

Pros: Lightweight

Cons: Unstable, Not durable

Best Uses: Hiking, Backpacking, Car Camping

Describe Yourself: Casual/ Recreational

What Is Your Gear Style: Minimalist

I have had this pot and the non-stick version that I no longer see here. Great pot for the money. Especially great starter pot. There are plenty of things to spend money on when starting outdoor activities. This pot does not have the rings on the bottom that reduce sliding around on the stove. I prefer the version that does not have the bail and would probably cut the bail and tabs off if I were to buy another. My current one uses a pot grabber instead. It will ding easy but just ding it back out and keep going.

(legalese)

January 27, 2009

A list of hikes done in or near Portland Oregon

Huckleberry Picking/ Hiking Indian Heaven Wilderness

Notes are from a Sept Hike:

We will be driving up to Hood River and crossing the bridge then up to Trout Lake were we turn and head up into the National Forrest. We will then go to the Junction Lake Trail head. We have two choices – we can hike in from this trail head, or we can drop of some vehicles and proceed to the Cultus Creek trail head further up and then hike one way back through the wilderness and thus have a one way shuttle with the cars we dropped off earlier. I will need to to check the distance and see if we have time to do this one way hike. I spoke to the rangers this past week and the Huckleberries were very late this year so if the weather stays nice we should be arriving when the berries are ripe and sweet. I will be calling this week again to check.

You will want to wear appropriate hiking clothes and be prepared for extreme weather changes as this is a high elevation and storms can roll in and temperatures drop rapidly. (Night temperatures may be freezing – not that we plan to sleep there but you want to be prepared.) Everyone should carry extra non-cotton clothes, a jacket, a flash light, sufficient water (a filter system is great too). Of course wear sturdy shoes – hiking boots preferred. Bring bug spray. There is not normally mosquitoes from August on but this year due to the late snow melt the mosquitoes have lingered – although the cooler nights probably have knocked down the numbers by now.

Bring containers for huckleberries and food for to eat along the way.

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Silver Star/ Indian Pits

11001 NE 189th St
Battle Ground, WA 98604

Meet in the west parking lot at the Meadow Glade SDA church at 1:00 pm. If all goes like clock work, we will be ready to caravan up the road by 1:15 pm.

This is a fantastic hike for everyone. The open ridge and rock outcroppings along this hike allow for great views along the entire hike. Even those who don’t go all the way to the top will enjoy spectacular views. The Indian Pits are a rarely visited site featuring stone structures that were built by Native Americans. This is a very special place to visit.

The following link and description come from NW Hiker… I have made some additions as necessary.

http://www.nwhiker.co…

Length: 5.2 Miles round trip (to summit and back, add another 1.5- 2 miles for the Indian Pits)
Elevation Change: 1400′ Elevation gain
Season: Late Spring thru Fall
Difficulty: Challenging (I would say easy to moderate)
Permit: NW Forest Pass Required (Signs were removed a couple seasons ago and never replaced)
Features: This northern approach to Silver Star Mountain via a trail called Ed’s Trail, is one of the most beautiful hikes in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The trail head is at the end of Forest Road #4109.

The hikes up Silver Star Mountain almost all follow old road beds that were in place for logging and for access to the fire lookout facility that used to be on the top of the mountain. This hike is a partial exception to that rule.

The begins a moderate climb and after a couple switchbacks follows one of the old roads for a short distance. Then the trail leads away from the road bed and becomes a stand alone trail referred to as Ed’s Trail.

Ed’s Trail is a delightful hike up the east side of the Silver Star Mtn ridge line. In June this hike is a floral garden. Anytime the weather cooperates you have exceptional views of the Cascade Volcanos, such as Mt St Helens, Mt Rainier, Mt Adams, Mt Hood, and even Mt Jefferson.

This trail runs parallel to the road bed trail that you can use on return for variety. At times the trails are only a few hundred feet apart. Ed’s Trail takes you along the east side of the ridge and through a free standing arch. Right after the arch, the trail becomes very steep and challenging. However, it never seemed dangerous to me. (there are some drop offs along this trail, but less intimidating than most of the gorge hikes, just keep children under control through this section)

At about 2 miles this trail connects with the road bed trail that will take you to the summit of the mountain. As you approach the top you will notice that Silver Star appears to have 2 summits. The one on the north is obviously the higher. Both summits are worth the time and effort.

After feasting on the vistas and floral displays, you can return on the alternate route via the road be trail that takes you back to the original trail where you began the hike.

Venturing further south another 0.75 – 1 mile on a faint track will reward the hiker with a journey back in time to some rarely visited Native American ruins referred to as the Silver Star Indian Pits.

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Dry Creek Falls and nearby Pinnacles

This hike is located in Cascade Locks, OR immediately off Bridge of the Gods. It’s a fairly easy hike, first to a stunning waterfall and then to some unusual pinnacle rock formations. Distance is approximately 7 miles round trip with a gentle elevation gain of 800 feet.

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Devil’s Rest Hike #5

This is a fairly well known and frequented hike in the Gorge that can be started at the Angel’s Rest trailhead. That’s where we will start it. It’s about 7 miles long with an elevation gain of 2300 ft. I would describe it as mostly sheltered and moderate in overall difficulty level. It has several pretty views.

Carpooling will require that we first meet at the Gateway. Then we’ll proceed east on the 84 and get off at Exit 28. Once off the exit, proceed east a short distance to the Angel’s Rest parking lot(on the right side).

Bring plenty of water, your trekking poles and hiking boots.

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15 mi. hike in Forest Park

let’s do an in and out 15 mile round trip hike in Forest Park. We’ll meet at the Viet Nam Memorial, hike to the Birch Trail, eat lunch/snacks and return. Parking is available very close by at the Zoo and I believe there is parking even closer to the memorial. We’ll meet at the memorial at 8 AM. And as it stands at the moment, it’s supposed to rain and so dress accordingly. Expect some mud. Gaters are recommended.

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Dog Mtn.

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Hamilton Mtn.

Hamilton Mtn. is located on the Washington side of the Gorge very close to Beacon Rock. To get there I recommend you cross north over the Columbia on the 205 and head East on the 14 about 15 miles past Washougal. To access the trailhead, you will see a road on the left directing you to a campground. Park at the lot that you will come to on the right hand side. NW Forest Pass is not required.

I consider this hike to be an easy moderate. At this point, we’ll be covering a little more distance. It is 8 miles round trip with an elevation gain of about 2400 ft. It contains a steep section of about 1/3 mile. The rest is not bad.

Scenically, it has a stunning waterfall, and 2 knockout scenic views.

TIP ABOUT TRYING ON NEW BOOTS: Besides checking for fit, overall comfort and support, when buying new boots, you should also double check that your feet don’t slide inside the boots. If you come down a very steep section and your feet slide to the front of the shoe, you stand an excellent chance of smashing your toes and cause them to bleed under your nails. It can be very painful, especially, if you then keep on hitting the bones on the tip of your toes.
Good outdoor stores will have some inclined surface for you to check for sliding. Don’t decide on a pair until you check for possible sliding.

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Dog Mtn. #4

Steep hiking begins with this one ; consequently it’s a huffer and puffer. We will gain an altitude of about 2700 ft. Distance will depend on our return route.

I would rate this one no more than a difficult- moderate hike. If you’ve never done it before or are not in shape, it will seem more difficult than that.

If we luck out with consistent warmer temperatures, we could start seeing the wildflowers bloom. But even if we don’t, the last .7 mi are scenically quite stunning.

All previous requirements apply(pay particular attention to your essentials). Trekking poles are highly advisable particularly should we hit some snowy spots(unlikely). AND NO COTTON. This is were it becomes more critical. You will sweat. We will lunch at the summit. Bring lots of food.

You will notice that we are meeting at Gateway a litttle earlier. Should the wildflowers be in bloom, the parking lot at the trailhead will fill-up with cars quickly.

This would be a good one to follow-up with a soak at Bonneville. Think about it. We don’t have to decide right now. Just bring a bathing suit and a towel. I will join you if some of you would like to do it. The cost is $15.00/person.

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Backpack on the Salmon River

Join us for a short backpack and camping along the Salmon River at the Rolling Riffle campground. It’s 2 miles and a moderate gain from the parking lot / trailhead on Salmon River Road to the campground. From there we can try day hikes along the river and possibly up Hunchback Mountain, depending on snow conditions. The Salmon River is a beautiful, fast-moving white water river and the forest here has a lot of old growth trees.

The weather is warming but we may still encounter some snow and/or mud on both the road and trail. The campground elevation is 1950 feet. Wear waterproof boots, gaiters and consider bringing yak-trax if you have them. Bring a pad or small tarp to sit on. If we climb up Hunchback Mountain to Kinzel Lake we will definitely hit some snow, but there are other nice hikes along the river.

Directions: To get there, we drive out to Mt Hood on Highway 26. Just before Mt. Hood in the town of Welches, we follow the Old Salmon River Road in about 5 miles. There’s a parking area near the bridge.

What to bring:

Lightweight tent
Sleeping bag
Gaiters
Waterproof boots
The ten essentials.
Stove
Food
Camera
Water filter or purifying tablets
Warm clothing! The forecast is good, but we will be at almost 2000 feet and we may hike higher.
Small tarp – the ground may be wet or snowy.

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EAGLE CREEK #3

Eagle creek is a 12-14 mi. in and out hike with a spread-out elevation gain of only 1000 ft. There is no snow on this trail. What we will loose in conditioning by elevation gain, we will make-up for with the distance covered. I plan to take us past Tunnel Falls. We’ll stop for lunch just past these falls and then turn around.

BE AWARE that immediately past Tunnel Falls there is a 10-20 yard section of trail that falls off dramatically
on one side. If you have difficulty with such a situation you might seriously consider skipping this hike. Alternatively, you can turn around and not proceed through Tunnel Falls(anyway it’s fairly close to the end). Also, along the way there are a bunch of narrow stream crossings.

Eagle Creek is located off exit 41 on the 84. Follow the signs. There is a fish hatchery nearby. You will need your NW Forest passes to park.

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Wyeth Trail #2

The Wyeth trail is located in the Gorge just west of Mt. Defiance. It is approximately 11-12 miles round trip with an elevation gain of 3700 ft. on the way up. It is not particularly steep and the trail is fairly wide most of the way. If conditions permit, we will lunch at North Lake.

The parking lot is located off the 84 at Exit 51.

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Angel’s rest in the Gorge #1b

Angel’s Rest is generally considered an easy hike. It is 4+ miles round trip with approximately 1300 ft. elevation gain. Very pretty with a stream on the way up and a beautiful overlook of the Columbia at the summit. To get to the summit, however, you do have to do an approximately 8 ft. high scramble over some rocks(easy).

We will be carpooling from the Gateway. Angel’s rest is a relatively short distance from the Gateway and is located off exit 28 as you proceed east along the 84. I’ve scheduled to meet at Gateway at 8 AM because the parking lot at Angel’s Rest fills-up real fast in the Spring(though parking along the road is quite common).

This is the perfect time to begin talking about issues in hiking. For now, I will talk about ESSENTIALS that you MUST take along with you and for that purpose, you must have a backpack. The essentials are:

First aid kits(everyone must carry one; go online for recommendations on what to include)
Sunglasses
Sunscreen(though I only put it on when hiking in extremely exposed trails)
Extra clothing(including gloves and a warm headcovering; even in May, it can get mighty chilly at the higher elevations)
An extra pair of socks( in case we get unpredictably rained on)
Snacks(I’ll talk about food some other time) and lunch for longer hikes
Plenty of water
Something like a Swiss Army knife or at least a plain small knife

and if the worst occurs: matches or a firestarter, a headlamp and/or flashlight and extra food.

Though we will be hiking on well delineated trails that I am familiar with you might consider taking a compass and trail map.

AND OH YES: NO COTTON CLOTHING. I WILL DEFINITELY TURN YOU AROUND AT THE GATEWAY. You might be able to do this hike with trail runners but hiking boots would be preferable.

I’m not placing an upper limit on the number of people that can attend because we can always break down into smaller groups.

Some people wimp out because of rain. Unless there’s a monsoon(and I have experienced some of those in the Gorge), I will not cancel. This is the NW–get over it! And besides some rains really enhance the beauty of the trails. Don’t let the rain deter you from hiking!

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Exploring a New Trail in Forest Park: Cannon Trail

The other day I was driving down to the 30 along Germantown Rd.( for those of new to Portland, it is located in the hills immediately west of the NW industrial area and is close to the St. John’s bridge). At one point I noticed a trail called the Cannon Trail(which, I believe, was designated as a new trail). It had it’s own parking area. I’ve never hiked so far up in Forest Park and do not have any information on this trail. I’d love to explore and do it with you folks.

I propose that we meet in front of the Lucky Lab on NW Quimby at 10 AM to carpool. I will lead the way to the trail in my car and provide all the other drivers with directions.

At the moment the long-term forecast calls for rain with temps. in the mid 40s(imagine that, rain in Portland)
DO NOT WEAR COTTON. I WILL REFUSE YOU TO JOIN US. If you wish, bring an umbrella. I would also recommend boots over trail runner/ running type of shoes. BRING WATER.

I will do my best to get some further info. on it before we meet but none may be available. Does anyone who is very interested in coming have a set of maps of Forest Park? If so, please bring it along with you.

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Oneanta Trail to 2800 ft. elev.

carpool to the Triple Falls Trailhead( just east of Multnomah Falls). There are several waterfalls along the lower part of our destination. Once we pass Triple Falls, we’ll be hiking on the Oneanta Trail and the elevation gain will pick-up. It’s been quite a while since I’ve hiked on the upper part of this trail and I don’t remember much about it. If we’re up to it, we may connect with the Franklin Ridge Trail for about an extra 2/3 mi or so.

Does anyone have an up-to-date guidebook that covers this hike? Could you bring it with you and possibly make a couple of copies of the map?

The drive from Gateway to the Trailhead is simple: proceed east on the 84, off at Exit 35, turn west towards Ainsworth State Park and proceed about 1.5 mi. to Triple Falls TH parking lot. Needless to say, dress warmly. Don’t forget your gloves, extra socks and bring your gaters. Bring snacks, lunch and lots of fluids(including lots of water). And oh yes, treking poles. If you have yak traks, bring those as well.

This will be an in and out hike and the distance, depending on how far we go, will be 10-12 miles.

Let’s hope for acceptable weather.

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Cowlitz River Canoe Trip – Vader to Castle Rock, Washington

This is a fun and mild canoe trip. I did this last summer. There is some nice rive bars and islands to goof around on and a tributary that is fun to paddle back into for lunch which has a hard interesting sandstone bottom. This was a camp area at one time for the Cowlitz Indians.

The trip is about 13 miles in length and takes about 5 hours not including time to goof around and have some packed lunch along the way. Considering the drive which is about 1 hour north of Portland and stopping to rent canoes and gear, it will be a full day. We will need to start early for this.

Logistics:

– We need people that have vehicles that can be used for shuttling and
can carry a canoe or two. Mine can carry two canoes. Please let me
know in your RSVP.
– If you have a canoe that can be used for this, please let me know also.
– Reservations for the canoes are nessesary.

Cost will be posted here later. The more people we have the cheaper.

Let’s see how many are interested and then we can tighten up the details from there. This could be combined with a camping trip, but I think it will likely just be a day event. – Ken

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Tieton River Rafting Trip & Camping

Tieton River Rafting Trip & Camping

Caroline Rose has suggested this rafting and camping trip. It sounds like a lot of fun! Please contact her for arrangements.

Wet Planet is a locally based company that does incredible white water rafting trips around the Pacific Northwest. In September only, they offer a special 15 mile, half-day trip on the Tieton River.

“When most other rivers in the Pacific Northwest have run out of water, the Tieton River provides an excellent ‘season finale’. The yearly release of water from Rim Rock Lake each September turns the Tieton River into a big wave, class III+ roller coaster. With steep gradient and guaranteed water, the Tieton offers non-stop whitewater action from start to finish. Each September, the Wet Planet crew heads to the Tieton River for this incredible late season whitewater event. The typically gorgeous fall weather found on the eastern flanks of the Cascades, ponderosa pine forests, spectacular basalt gorges, and guaranteed high water all combine to create an incredible whitewater experience. The action on the Tieton is fast paced, stopping spots are rare, and the rapids are continuous. Rafting enthusiasts looking for great water levels in the fall won’t want to miss this trip.”

This will be on the weekend of September 22nd + 23rd, as it’s the last weekend they offer this trip. The Tieton River is located 3 hour outside of Portland. We would drive up to the river on Saturday (carpooling can be arranged), camp at their campground Saturday night, whitewater rafting trip on Sunday morning, and drive back to Portland Sunday afternoon.

Please let me know ASAP if you are interested in this trip and I will make arrangements with Wet Planet.

The cost is $75 per person [$70 if we have 8 or more / $65 if we have 18 or more] which includes a BBQ lunch and all the equipment you need (wetsuit, booties, life vest, helmet, waterproof jacket etc.) to enjoy this incredible adventure.

Like all event with all events of the Adventure Group ? you are responsible for your own safety and well being. Have fun!

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Lewis River Trail #31

I’ve never been on this trail but over the past several years, I’ve heard a great deal about it. The trail cuts through old growth forest and meanders along the Lewis River. It’s full of spectacular waterfalls that apparently rival Eagle Creek. Apparently, it has mild grades full of ups and downs. A literal visual cornucopia. Overall, the level of difficulty seems to be moderate.

It’s located south of Mt. St. Helens and east of the Swift Reservoir. Driving time should be 1 1/2-2hrs.

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Hike to Soda Peaks Lake in WA

This hike is located at the Southern end of the Gifford Pinchot in WA. It is a steep hike(at least some of the sections) to a beautiful swimmable lake. It’s approximately 8 miles round trip with an elevation gain of about 2600 ft.( doesn’t sound like much but take my word for it, it is steep). If you want to swim in the lake, wear your suit or pack it and change in the forest. The water will probably be cold but will feel great after all that perspiring. Take a towel as well.

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Salmon Butte Hike

I just learned that part of the roadway to Salmon Butte was washed away during the winter and is closed. I am therefore changing this event to a trail in Washington.

What I have in mind is one of two possible trails: Bluff Mtn. or Soda Lake. Bluff Mtn. is a 12 mile almost totally exposed trail with beautiful views; Soda Lake is a 7-8 mile steep hike to a beautiful lake that you can swim in if weather permits.

I’ve been to both. Both are wonderful. I just need to get some info. on trail and nearby road conditions and then let you guys choose the trail.

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Hike on the Wyeth Trail to N. Lake

This is an 11.5-12.5 mile rt hike with a 3700+ elevation gain. The trail is fairly wide in many spots with a couple of nice viewpoints on the way up; but the reward is N. Lake, our destination. I find alpine lakes to be quite beautiful. Did I mention that this trail is located on the OR side of the Gorge?

I was there 3-4 wks. ago. There was a fair amount of blowdown but only in about 5 spots was it annoying to get over. As the trail plateaud, there was a 1-2″ layer of snow. Because of the snow, the trail became indiscernible and I never made it to the lake. It was also a bit chilly up there.

How would I rate it? Something inbetween Dog and Hamilton except significantly longer. Not recommended for beginners. Bring lots of snacks, lots of water and a nice lunch. It is a bit high so I would definitely take additional clothing. If you like real chilly water, pack a bathing suit.

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Hike for Beginners to Horsetail Falls

Originally, in an email to the membersip, I asked if those staying in town for the holiday weekend would be interested in doing the Wyeth trail to North Lake on 5/28. Out of the 3 that responded, 2 indicated they were looking for a beginner’s hike. The Wyeth Trail is not exactly a beginner’s hike. Therefore, instead, we’ll do Horsetail. It is about 4-5 miles long with an approximate elevation gain of 500 ft. A very nice trail to a beautiful waterfall on the Oregon side of the Gorge.

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May 21, 2008

Spruce Run Lake and Lost Lake Map

Spruce Run Lake USGS Elsie Quad, Oregon, Topographic Map

Spruce Run Lake is a Lake in the state of Oregon (county of Clatsop), located at latitude – longitude coordinates (also known as lat-long or GPS coordinates) of N 45.81817 and W -123.5704. Spruce Run Lake is shown in the center of the topographic (topo) map, which is sourced from the United States Geographical Survey map USGS Elsie quad.

This area has camp grounds, hiking and backpacking trails as well as canoeing adn fishing. Bloom Lake is not on this map but is in this area and can be part of an outing aas well.

There is both flatwater and white water paddling available in this area.

Lost Lake is located at:

Clatsop County Oregon
Feature Type: Lake
Latitude: 45.8240
Longitude: -123.5790
Elevation: 1476 ft (450 m)

Compared with Spruce Run Lake at:

Feature Type: Lake
Latitude: 45.8182
Longitude: -123.5704
Elevation: 1020 ft (311 m)

There seems to be a Creek Pond in this same area.  I believe there is some overlap and am going to research this more.

May 20, 2008

http://portlandhikers.com/

I like this site…

Camp 18 to Saddle Mountain

Filed under: Activities,Adventures,Backpacking,Boy Scouts,Family,Hiking,Travel — rmay4 @ 12:42 am

“Never climb in the saddle on an empty stomach.” It’s one of the adages in the West and certainly applies to climbing into Saddle Mountain State Park in Oregon‘s northern Coast Range.

Without the appropriate morning nourishment, the three-mile ascent promises to make you weak in the knees long before those staggering views come into view. Luckily for the hungry hiker, Camp 18, 60 miles west of Portland, stands as a true Western pit stop, where you can throw on one serious feedbag at the doorstop to Saddle Mountain.

Camp 18’s sprawling restaurant/museum is dedicated to preserving relics of Oregon‘s early logging days. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, it lays out a buffet spread that pays tribute to Paul Bunyanesque logger appetites of distant lore. Because of its popularity, there is sometimes a wait, but this offers the perfect chance to wander around the grounds checking out the array of early logging machinery and numerous chain-saw carvings.

Once you hear your name called on the loudspeaker, head inside and don’t be surprised if you have a critter of some sort for company at the table. The massive log cabin is a Grizzly Adams daydream, complete with stuffed cougars, numerous wall-hung elk heads, chandeliers made wholly of antlers, a giant fireplace, and the scent of mammoth portions of piping hot food and black coffee.

One warning: Bring your appetite. Just looking at the many items on the buffet table, including salads, fruit, waffles, breads, eggs, sausage, bacon, ham, prime rib and assorted casseroles, is enough to make you full. At $11.95 the smorgasbord is a bargain only if you’re really ready to chow down. Fortunately, those hesitant to take on the lumberjack portions can order anything from fruit-topped waffles with fresh whipped cream to grilled rainbow trout in single-serving sizes at reasonable prices.

On the way out, make sure to pack one of the tree-trunk-size Camp 18 cinnamon rolls for a perfect snack after reaching the summit.

Three miles up

Which returns to the point. Don’t forget when reaching for that second helping of bacon and waffles that you’re here for a hike. Fortunately for those of us who tend to overindulge, behind the restaurant is a short trail that meanders along Humbug Creek, a good spot to warm up your legs while digesting that irresistible last biscuit.

The entrance to Saddle Mountain State Park is only a few miles west on U.S. 26. Turn right at the entrance and follow the rough pavement steadily upward until you reach the parking lot and trailhead at the end of the road. Get out of your car and look up. Yep, that’s where you’re headed, and yes, those specks are people.

Saddle Mountain offers unrivaled 360-degree views from its barren peak in the Coast Range. The reason to get this hike in sooner rather than later is that it collects more than 120 inches of annual rainfall, and from November to May the mountain is usually enveloped in thick gray clouds rising from the coast.

The full ascent is three miles, but the diversity makes for an interesting hike. Give yourself four to five hours for the full hike, taking in the scenery along the trail and stopping at the top for a snack and some time to just soak in the view.

The trail emerges from dense spruce and hemlock forest into dry meadow at the summit this time of year. Along the way, watch for the numerous basalt outcroppings formed from lava flows over the past 20 million years. Though the peak growing season is past, wildflowers and berries can still be found along the trails.

On a clear day, the view from the summit includes the Pacific Ocean to the west, and the Columbia River, the Astoria Bridge and the distant Olympic Range to the north. To the east, the looming white peaks of mounts Rainier, St. Helens, Adams and Hood jut skyward. Closer sites in the surrounding valleys show the recent scars of wide-scale logging to the east, and the forest to the west is on the rebound from logging in the 1920s and fires in the ’30s.

From here, it’s all downhill, but pay careful attention to staying on the trail at all times because of the wear and tear of a season’s use and the fragility of the mountain’s many rare plant species.

And if you find yourself a little peckish from all that exertion, Camp 18’s on the way home, andre it’s surely working up something hearty for dinner.

  • WHAT: Camp 18 for Sunday buffet, followed by a trek up Saddle Mountain
  • GETTING THERE: Camp 18 is 60 miles west of Portland on U.S. 26 at milepost 18. The entrance to Saddle Mountain State Park issix more miles west. Take a right off U.S. 26 at the sign for Saddle Mountain and follow the sometimes rough and potholed paved road seven miles to parking.
  • FOOD: Camp 18 Restaurant and Logging Museum serves its Sunday buffet 10 a.m.-2 p.m. until Thanksgiving. Restaurant hours, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. for breakfast and lunch, dinner 4-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays. Reservations for parties of 10 or more.
  • THE HIKE: A three-mile ascent broken up by a diverse landscape and numerous viewpoints. Six-mile round trip requires a moderate to good fitness level, but the hike is easily adapted for shorter, less strenuous outings for all levels.
  • WHAT TO WEAR: Hard-soled hiking boots for sometimes rough and unstable trail conditions. Pack a windbreaker for the often-gusty summit. Though the peak, at 3,283 feet, is not high enough for a drastic temperature change, layer clothing if you go on a cool day.
  • WHAT TO PACK: An appetite, a sense of adventure and a pair of binoculars

http://www.oregonhiking.com/

Filed under: Backpacking,Camping,Canoeing — rmay4 @ 12:26 am
Tags: , ,

http://www.oregonhiking.com/

Welcome to author William L. Sullivan’s favorite Oregon places — more than 270 places to hike, camp, ski, snowshoe, bike, raft, canoe, kayak, and climb.

I have not gone through all of this site but it looks pretty good so far.  Take a look for yourself.
Randy

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